Thursday, May 22, 2008

ENA6 - Feature Spotting

You've had the chance to practise lots of 1b questions over the last few weeks, now it's time to practise the other 5 mark question in question 1. This is pretty simple: you're asked to "comment linguistically" on 3 different language features (the nature of which depends upon the topic of the paper). This basically means that you pick out 3 interesting language features and label them accurately (2 marks per feature up to a total of 5). It's that simple. You don't need to explain the features, or who has researched them: just label them. You can - if you feel a bit insecure - say a little more about them to clarify what you mean.

An example might be the one below:

Comment linguistically on 3 features of child language in the following extract.

Parent: Did you have a nice day at nursery?
Child: It was good. Some childrens from big school came and play guitars for us.
Parent: That sounds fun.
Child: My hurted my knee at nursery.
Parent: How did you do that?
Child: My falled over.
Parent: Where did you hurt it?
Child: On my knee, I telled you dat.
Parent: But where were you. Inside or outside?
Child: At nursery. I was riding bike.


So, for one feature you might say "The child has used overgeneralised past tense endings on the verbs hurted, telled and falled". And that would get you 2 marks out of the 5 you need.

What else could you pick out and label to get you the full 5 marks?

28 comments:

Dessy said...

if you said the child is clearly at the telegraphic stage because majority of their utterances have only three words and they are able to construct simple sentences,

would that be valid, considering "telegraphic stage" is not a feature?

Dan said...

Good question... it's probably best to pick out a feature of the telegraphic stage rather than naming the stage as a feature, if you see what i mean.

I'd go for something like the absence of a determiner/other word class and then say that's a feature of the stage.

Dessy said...

ok

sabrina said...

The child uses the possessive 1st person singular pronoun my, rather than the subject 1st person singular pronoun i. This is perhaps done because the child does not know how to distinguish the subject forms i and my.

The child undertakes the process deletion. As in the last line they miss out the determiner 'a' to label the concrete noun 'bike'.

lastly another feature the child uses overgeneralizes as they say telled where they over apply the past past participle 'ed' to try and establish the past tense.

sabrina said...

The last bit is meant to say another feature the child uses is overgeneralisation

Dan said...

That's pretty good - 4/5 i think. You could get the 5th mark by being slightly more precise on the deletion bit. "Deletion" is normally used when discussing phonological features (eg "ca" instead of "cat" would be called deletion), so it might just be simpler to say that the child is at the telegraphic stage and has therefore used telegraphic syntax, omitting the determiner "a" (or possibly "my").

Does that make sense?

Dessy said...

(this is for unit 5)

i'm reading one of the powerpoint presentations you gave us in class, i know that EME stands for Early Modern English but (don't shoot me!) i dunno what PDE stands for???

perhaps Post something English? or Pre something English?

Dan said...

Present Day English

Dan said...

...better than saying Modern English and confusing it with Middle English (which would be ME too!).

Dessy said...

oh

Dessy said...

if "i had been asking" is past perfect progressive, what is "i had been asked"

Dessy said...

'my great and highly reverenced friend, Dr Johnsosn' what function is "friend" in this phrase?

Dan said...

"I had been asked" is a passive in the past tense, i think.

Dan said...

"friend" is the head word in the first noun phrase. There's a second noun phrase afterwards "Doctor Johnson".

Dessy said...

so the nounf phrase friend is modifying anoher noun phrase, Dr Johnson?

Dessy said...

what about ignoring the i , and leaving it as had been asked? or had been told or had been anything, is had been always passive?

Dan said...

"had been" isn't always passive, as your "had been asking" demonstrates: it all depends on the main verb and who or what is being affected by the main verb. In the case of "I had been asked", the subject of the clause is "I" but there's no obvious agent doing the asking. The subject is the object of the verb "to ask".

Passive sentences can obscure/hide agency.

Dessy said...

or show victim status?

Dan said...

yeah sometimes, but not always... be aware of context

Dessy said...

i am sure my dear M----- wil give me a little share of concern for the loss of my great, and highly reverenced friend, Dr Johnson.

how many clauses are in this sentence,
what is the subject verb and object.
thank you

Dan said...

You try first! What's your thinking on this one?

Jack Langton said...

hello dan, i am a keen admirer of your work but could you please put more blogs up to help A2 students with language production? thanks alot!

Dan said...

Hi Jack

Thanks - what sort of stuff are you after? If it's ENA5 or ENA6 I might be able to help, but I know sod all about about EA4W.

Jack Langton said...

its for ena6 for aqa, the synoptic paper. Its worth 35 marks out of 80 so holds alot of importance! as much advice you could possibly give will be appreciated :)

Dan said...

That's question 2a. You could try the post from May 8th on editorials and letters if you haven't already. There's also a brief one from June 28th 2006 that might help. I'll try to pull together some more ideas later on today. Hope that's a start at least...

Dessy said...

i think there are two clauses, i am sure my dear M and for the loss of my great and higly reverenced friend...
because 'a lttle share of concern' is the object, but i think i am sure my dear M is a clause on it's own because i. am. sure, oh no! the am sure is a verb phrase... so what's the object, my friend M? cause it's a noun phrase and they are usually the object. sir i think i know it, but i'm not sure.. so please clarify...

the loss...reverenced friend cannot be a clause because it has no verb.
is this a simple sentence, cause now i can only see one verb phrase, no i can see two...'am sure' and 'will give me', it might be complex, simple sentences are easier to spot. i think i've confused myself...I've done this text b4 as well...Englsih is not this complicated!

Dessy said...

sir a little birdie told me that you have exaemplar unit 6 papers from former sfx studetns... will you be in next week so i can stop by and collect some?

Dan said...

Yep, we have a few of these and I can give you a copy or two. I'm at a funeral on Monday so won't be in til Tuesday next week.

In the meantime if you go to the AQA A link from the main blog page, click on "guidance" and "unit 6 candidate response booklet" you'll see a range of answers for one ENA6 paper.